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Jessica Orwig

Contributor
Jessica Orwig headshot

Jessica Orwig is a freelance writer for Inside Science focusing on physics. She majored in astrophysics at Ohio State and earned her masters in science and tech journalism from Texas A&M. When she’s not at her computer you can find her biking, hiking, painting, or playing the piano.

Author Articles
Photo of an airliner flying away from the photographer, over a forested seashore, as sun is low in the multicolored sky.
New research recommends allowing pilots to choose their own routes on trans-Atlantic flights to reduce carbon emissions.
Joel Shurkin, Contributor
worker bees surrounding queen
Honeybees relay the location of the queen through pheromones.
Joel Shurkin, Contributor
Several medical students wearing blue scrubs walk in a hallway.
New courses could help prepare young doctors for the medical challenges of a warming world.
Joel Shurkin, Contributor
dolphin rescue
The animals' bodies contained pollutants not found in dolphins before.
Joel Shurkin, Contributor
Fox
Some evidence suggests that foxes may be trying to domesticate themselves.
Joel Shurkin, Contributor
School bus
Some students are continuing to learn while school doors are closed, but others may not be able to avoid losing ground.
Joel Shurkin, Contributor

The Earth's Equatorial Bulge Shapes the Planet's Physics

The Earth's Equatorial Bulge Shapes the Planet's Physics amalate Fri, 10/15/2021 - 15:20
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Image of a globe, highlighting the equator

Meteorologists, oceanographers and snipers have to account for this deformation.

Will Sullivan, Staff Writer

The 2021 Nobel Prizes In Physiology or Medicine, Physics and Chemistry

The 2021 Nobel Prizes In Physiology or Medicine, Physics and Chemistry amalate Fri, 10/01/2021 - 15:01
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Illustration for Nobel 2021
Media rights

Copyright American Institute of Physics

The announcements of this year's winners begin on October 4. Click on the image to see all of our related coverage.

Inside Science Staff

Will Sullivan

Staff Writer
Will Sullivan in a gray t-shirt, with a streetscape and buildings in the background.

Will Sullivan is a staff writer and editor at Inside Science focusing on physics and space. He majored in mathematics and minored in music at Swarthmore College. When he isn’t writing about science, he can be found running long distances, playing music with friends, and watching science fiction and horror movies.

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Author Articles
Lunar Prospector by the moon
Scientists need to pin down the lifetime to better understand fundamental physics questions, like how the universe evolved.
Will Sullivan, Staff Writer
Eath's equator seen from space
Meteorologists, oceanographers and snipers have to account for this deformation.
Will Sullivan, Staff Writer
Close up of the body and bridge of a violin
Researchers compare tree rings from an instrument's body to other wood to estimate the instrument's age.
Will Sullivan, Staff Writer

Haley Weiss

Staff Writer
Photo of Haley Weiss

Haley Weiss (@haleysweiss) is a staff writer and editor at Inside Science. Her work covering the intersection of science, health, and culture has appeared in The Atlantic, Scientific American, Popular Science, and more.Β 

Author Articles
An illustrated silhouette of James Bond surrounded by the names of infectious diseases
While martinis probably aren't more protective than good travel habits, researchers can't explain the superspy's luck.
Haley Weiss, Staff Writer
A spider crawling up to a web
What nature's most complex constructions can tell us about how the brain organizes behaviors.
Haley Weiss, Staff Writer
Illustration for Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 2021
Award recognizes research that explains how our nerves sense the environment around us.
Haley Weiss, Staff Writer
Lobster against a blue background with dna
Examining small molecules that attach to DNA strands can help build a sense of a lobster's age.
Haley Weiss, Staff Writer

Stone Cold: How Rocks Become Glacial Tables

Stone Cold: How Rocks Become Glacial Tables amalate Fri, 09/17/2021 - 14:19
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Illustration of a glacier table
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Copyright American Institute of Physics

Scientists set out to investigate how these unusual structures form.

Katharine Gammon, Contributor

An Easier Way to Temper Chocolate

An Easier Way to Temper Chocolate amalate Fri, 09/03/2021 - 16:07
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Tempered Chocolate Illustration by Abigail Malate
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Copyright American Institute of Physics

Researchers discover a simpler (and greener) tempering method to give chocolate its texture, gloss and snap.

Meeri Kim, Contributor

Krystal Vasquez

Contributor
portrait of writer Krystal Vasquez, smiling, wearing glasses and a dark shirt with crisscrossing white stripes.

Krystal Vasquez (@caffeinatedkrys) is a freelance science writer in Los Angeles, California who enjoys writing about earth and environmental science. She is also currently finishing up her Ph.D. in atmospheric chemistry at the California Institute of Technology.Β 

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Many People With Cancer Lack Protection Against Measles and Mumps

Many People With Cancer Lack Protection Against Measles and Mumps amalate Mon, 08/16/2021 - 12:48
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Illustration of a measles virus particle

Fallen vaccination rates pose a threat to this vulnerable population.

Karen Kwon, Contributor

Underwater Noise Pollution Could Damage Crucial Ocean Plants

Underwater Noise Pollution Could Damage Crucial Ocean Plants cmeyers Fri, 07/09/2021 - 16:05
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Fish swim over bed of seagrass
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First-of-its-kind study shows how human-generated sound could harm the ability of seagrass to store energy and detect gravity.

Karen Kwon, Contributor

A Pioneering Food Physicist Embraces a New Public Identity

A Pioneering Food Physicist Embraces a New Public Identity amalate Fri, 06/25/2021 - 18:33
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Megan Povey
Media credits

Portrait photo courtesy of Megan Povey. Background from Shutterstock.

Inside Science chats with Megan Povey about her research and what she has learned from transitioning genders later in life.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

Karen Kwon

Contributor
Portrait of Karen Kwon, standing, with trees and a railing in the background.

Karen Kwon is a science journalist based in the Washington, D.C. area and was an intern with Inside Science during the summer of 2021. She is also a graduate student in the Science, Health & Environmental Reporting Program (SHERP) at New York University. Originally from Seoul, Korea, she was a 2020 AAAS Mass Media Fellow at Scientific American and has a Ph.D. in chemistry. Follow her on Twitter @ykarenkwon.

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Illustration shows a astronaut in a futuristic suit using a watering can to water a plant on a dusty, red-tinged planet.
New research suggests gamma rays stunt plant growth.
Karen Kwon, Contributor
A fruit fly
Scientists identified competing neural pathways that control flies' decision making.
Karen Kwon, Contributor
Antibodies attack a virus
Fallen vaccination rates pose a threat to this vulnerable population.
Karen Kwon, Contributor
Engineers developed a soft robot that can move through sand and curve around objects where traditional robots struggle.
Karen Kwon, Contributor
Conceptual art showing graphene's molecular structure on an orange background.
A graphene layer shields an artwork against light, oxygen and moisture, and can be removed using an eraser.
Karen Kwon, Contributor
Image of an electronic skin device, a mix of golden and black tracings, perforated with holes.
New e-skin can withstand profuse sweating, resulting in more accurate readings of biomedical measurements.
Karen Kwon, Contributor

Shi En Kim

Contributor
Portrait of writer Shi En Kim, smiling, wearing a patterned shirt, with sunglasses poised atop her head.

Shi En Kim is a science writer and a final-year Ph.D. student in molecular engineering at the University of Chicago. Outside the lab, she freelances for various publications, including National Geographic, Scientific American, Science News, Slate and others. Follow her atΒ @goes_by_kim.

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Shi En Kim

Contributor
Portrait of writer Shi En Kim, smiling, wearing a patterned shirt, with sunglasses poised atop her head.

Shi En Kim is a science writer and a final-year Ph.D. student in molecular engineering at the University of Chicago. Outside the lab, she freelances for various publications, including National Geographic, Scientific American, Science News, Slate and others. Follow her atΒ @goes_by_kim.

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How to Speak Cicada

How to Speak Cicada amalate Fri, 05/28/2021 - 18:25
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Illustration of a Cicada Singing

Brood X is emerging across 15 states. Here's how to decode all that buzzing from the trees.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

Carolina Cuellar

Contributor
Carolina Cuellar

Carolina Cuellar is a science journalist and graduate student in the Science Communication Program at UC Santa Cruz. Before that, she worked as a Protein Engineering researcher after earning her bachelor’s degree in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology at UC Santa Cruz. In her free time, she enjoys traveling, gardening and reading. You can follow her on Twitter @Wzrd_of_Lnlynss.

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Room Temperature Superconductor: Holy Grail or Red Herring?

Room Temperature Superconductor: Holy Grail or Red Herring? amalate Fri, 04/30/2021 - 17:08
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Electrons illustration
Media credits

Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator

Scientists have crushed the quest for room temperature superconductors, but only at ridiculously high pressures.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

To Light or Not To Light Our Skies

To Light or Not To Light Our Skies cmeyers Fri, 04/16/2021 - 17:10
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Artist's image show DC at night with a starry sky
Media credits
Media rights

Copyright American Institute of Physics

Reducing light pollution could be as easy as turning off a switch, but it still requires a well-coordinated effort.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

The Oldest Evidence of Life on Earth is Being Stolen

The Oldest Evidence of Life on Earth is Being Stolen amalate Fri, 03/26/2021 - 13:59
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Illustration of stromatolites underwater
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Copyright American Institute of Physics

Researchers and Aboriginal people are working to protect 3.5-billion-year-old stromatolite fossils in western Australia.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

Feeding Seaweed to Cattle Could Help Curb Climate Change

Feeding Seaweed to Cattle Could Help Curb Climate Change amalate Fri, 03/19/2021 - 15:01
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Black Angus Cows grazing
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Steers that ate small amounts of seaweed produced far less of the greenhouse gas methane.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

Researchers Design Edible Holograms for Food

Researchers Design Edible Holograms for Food amalate Fri, 03/05/2021 - 16:17
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Rainbow holographic circles
Media credits

Laser etching on food-safe pigments can create 2D images that appear 3D.

Charles Q. Choi, Contributor

Not Just Bats: Researchers Say Numerous Mammals Could Host Unknown Coronaviruses

Not Just Bats: Researchers Say Numerous Mammals Could Host Unknown Coronaviruses amalate Fri, 02/19/2021 - 14:19
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Alpaca photograph by Victor Sassen on Flickr.
Media credits

A new model suggests that many more mammal species than was previously known could host the creation of novel coronaviruses.

Meredith Fore, Contributor

How Ants Fight Fast-Evolving Enemy Microbes

How Ants Fight Fast-Evolving Enemy Microbes amalate Fri, 02/05/2021 - 15:01
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A beewolf wasp

A female beewolf wasp drags a bee into her nest to provision her larvae.

Media credits

Charlie Jackson via Flickr

Media rights

Bacterial allies may help insects win the evolutionary arms race against disease-causing microorganisms.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

Nikk Ogasa

Contributor
Portrait of Nikk Ogasa, smiling and wearing a blue shirt, with trees in the background.

Nikk Ogasa is a science journalist and graduate student in the Science Communication Program at UC Santa Cruz. He earned a master’s degree in geology at McGill University in Montreal, and before that worked at the US Geological Survey. In his free time, he enjoys martial arts, climbingΒ and reading. You can follow him on Twitter @nikkogasa.

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Author Articles
Artist's impression of a Devonian landscape
New research supports the idea that pulses of nutrients flushed from Devonian forests fueled ocean algae blooms that suffocated marine life.
Nikk Ogasa, Contributor
Stalagmites in a cave
A better understanding of past rainfall swings may help scientists better predict future ones.
Nikk Ogasa, Contributor
Deep sea vents gush fluids into the ocean
New discovery of ancient phosphorus-bearing minerals challenges assumptions about the way early life evolved.
Nikk Ogasa, Contributor
A dust storm lingers over dull red Martian soil, as a rover sits in the foreground of the image
Experiments reveal electrical sparks might light up the raging dust storms on Mars.
Nikk Ogasa, Contributor
An artist's representation of a water-filled crater on ancient Mars.
Ancient sediments reveal that shortly after emerging from the sea, microbial life may have adapted to survive in acidic lakes.
Nikk Ogasa, Contributor

Astronomers Are Studying the Atmospheres of Faraway Planets

Astronomers Are Studying the Atmospheres of Faraway Planets amalate Fri, 01/22/2021 - 17:01
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Exoplanet WASP-12b and its star.
Media credits

NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC)

How’s the weather up there? Even for exoplanets that are many light-years away, astronomers can learn about their atmospheres.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Masks Save Lives, but May Hinder Communication

Masks Save Lives, but May Hinder Communication amalate Fri, 01/08/2021 - 14:23
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Medical office setting, with staff and patients in masks
Media credits

DC Studio/Shutterstock

Masks may make communication even more difficult for those with hearing loss or who face language barriers.

Marcus Woo, Contributor

From LEGOs to Ziploc: The Science of the Snap Fit

From LEGOs to Ziploc: The Science of the Snap Fit amalate Thu, 12/10/2020 - 14:26
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Building LEGOs
Media credits

Wove Love/Shutterstock

New research reveals how that familiar click of two things locking together works.

Katharine Gammon, Contributor

The Geographical Origins of Thanksgiving Foods

The Geographical Origins of Thanksgiving Foods cmeyers Wed, 11/25/2020 - 13:16
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Thanksgiving foods

Celebrating the Indigenous people of the Americas who revolutionized what the world eats.

Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer

Tess Joosse

Contributor
photo of writer Tess Joosse

Tess Joosse is a journalist and student in the science communication graduate program at UC Santa Cruz. She grew up in Chicago, studied biology at Oberlin College, and now lives in California. You can find her on Twitter @tessjoosse, where she tweets about writing, baking, and her dog Leo.

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Author Articles
Green and red laser light spreads in many lines from a bright center point.
The microscopic lens bends light to quicken data transfer in computers.
Tess Joosse, Contributor
White foam laps at the beach as a person stands in the foreground. In the background, along the length of the beach are several wind turbines
A quarter century of shoreline measurements show that the supermoon’s gravitational force drives more erosion.
Tess Joosse, Contributor
Light filters through the forest canopy, with colorful leaves along the forest floor.
Scientists can identify plants by the light they reflect.
Tess Joosse, Contributor
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