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Today β€” 22 October 2021Main stream

Naval Group hands over third OPV to Argentine Navy

22 October 2021 at 08:50
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]00719cff-dbb0-4204-8953-b37628bd9d1d?sfvrsn=68c1dee6_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_7920-jni-14793.jpg?sfvrsn=68c1dee6_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small">Storny (P 53) was delivered to the Argentine Navy during a ceremony held in Concarneau, France, on 14 October. (Naval Group, France)</p> <p> The Argentine Navy's multimission offshore patrol vessel (OPV) programme marked another milestone on 14 October when French shipbuilder Naval Group handed over the third Bouchard (OPV 87)-class vessel, <em>Storny</em> (P 53), in Concarneau, Brittany. </p> <p> The delivery is part of a EUR319 million (USD380 million) contract signed by Naval Group with Argentina in 2018 to deliver four multimission OPVs. The first vessel, ARA <em>Bouchard</em> (formerly <em>L'Adroit</em> ) (P 51), was handed over in December 2020, followed by delivery of the second, ARA <em>Piedrabuena</em> (P 52), on 13 April. The fourth and final vessel, <em>Cordero</em> (P 54), was launched on 13 September. </p> <p><em>Storny</em> was built by Kership, a joint venture between Naval Group and Piriou. The ship was partly built in Lanester by Kership Lorient and assembled in Concarneau by Piriou Shipyards. The vessel features the same capabilities as <em>Piedrabuena</em> and is better armed and equipped than <em>Bouchard</em> . It is ice-capable, fitted with a bow thruster and an active stabilisation system. </p> <p>Other features included include Naval Group's Polaris combat management system and NiDL tactical data link system.</p> <p>The OPVs have an overall length of 87 m, a displacement of 1,650 tonnes, a top speed of 20 kt, and are armed with a 30 mm Marlin-WS gun, as well as two 12.7 mm and two 7.62 mm machine guns. It can accommodate a crew of 59 and has an endurance of 7,000 n miles.</p>

South Korean navy receives second upgraded KDX-I-class destroyer

22 October 2021 at 06:20
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]0a402ab8-8853-46c0-8506-fe2dc6dc2e78?sfvrsn=7c136c00_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_7899-jdw-14789.jpg?sfvrsn=7c136c00_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small"> South Korea's DAPA announced on 22 October that KDX-I-class destroyer Gwanggaeto Daewang was returned to RoKN after completing an upgrade programme. (RoKN)</p> <p>The second upgraded Gwanggaeto Daewang (KDX-I)-class destroyer has been returned to the Republic of Korea Navy (RoKN) after completing a modernisation programme aimed at improving the vessel's combat management system (CMS) and other sensors.</p> <p> South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) said in a statement that <em>Gwanggaeto Daewang</em> (pennant number DDG 971) was returned to the service on 22 October during a ceremony held at the Jinhae Naval Base in South Gyeongsang Province. </p> <p> The first destroyer of the three-vessel KDX-I class to have completed the upgrade was <em>Yang Manchun</em> (DDG 973), which returned to service in September 2020. The third destroyer, <em>Eulji Mundeok</em> (DDG 972), is currently undergoing upgrades and is expected to return to service in December, according to DAPA. </p> <p>The agency noted that the RoKN's Performance Improvement Programme (PIP), which began in September 2016, includes replacing the ships' ageing combat management system (CMS) with a modern, locally developed one that can not only handle three times as much data as the previous CMS but also process the information 100 times faster.</p> <p>To enhance their anti-submarine warfare capabilities, the 135.4 m-long destroyers are being fitted with a much more advanced towed array sonar system that is similar to the one found on the RoKN's FFX-series frigates.</p> <p> Moreover, RoKN officials told <em>Janes</em> that the vessels are being equipped with the Link 16 tactical datalink system as well as with more advanced external and internal communication and identification friend-or-foe systems. The vessels were commissioned between July 1998 and July 2000 and have a full-load displacement of 3,900 tonnes. </p>
Yesterday β€” 21 October 2021Main stream

Series of β€˜causal factors' resulted in fire risk and damage to amphibious assault ship Bonhomme Richard, US Navy report finds

20 October 2021 at 22:50
<div><img src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]95eb3932-1174-496a-a5fb-54a9ab61cd34?sfvrsn=d09f706c_2" style="display: none" class="invisible"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"><img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100" data-sf-ec-immutable=""><div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_7772-jni-14725.jpg?sfvrsn=d09f706c_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div><p class="text-body text-muted small">A series of β€œcausal factors” led to the fire risk and damage of the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), a US Navy investigation found. (US Navy)</p><p>Different categories of β€œcausal factors … allowed for the accumulation of significant risk and led to an ineffective fire response” for the 12 July 2020 blaze that caused the damage and eventual decommissioning of the amphibious assault ship USS <em>Bonhomme Richard</em> (LHD 6), according to the US Pacific Fleet Command Investigation released on 20 October. </p><p>The investigation identified the four categories of causal factors: the material condition of the ship, the training and readiness of the ship's crew, the integration – or the lack of it – between the ship and supporting shore-based firefighting organisations, and the oversight by commanders across multiple organisations.</p><p>The command investigation concluded that β€œa lack of familiarity with requirements and procedural non-compliance at multiple levels of command” contributed to the loss of ship.</p><p>In releasing the report, Admiral Bill Lescher, vice chief of naval operations (VCNO), emphasised the navy's commitment to making β€œurgent and necessary changes” to correct the deficiencies and related root causes that led to the <em>Bonhomme Richard</em> fire. </p><p>β€œThe loss of this ship was completely preventable,” Adm Lescher said in a statement. β€œAnd the navy is executing a deliberative process that includes taking appropriate accountability actions with respect to personnel assigned to <em>Bonhomme Richard</em> and the shore commands designed to support the ship while moored at Naval Base San Diego.” </p><p>Based on a separate criminal investigation, US 3rd Fleet command also preferred charges against one sailor, who is charged with aggravated arson and hazarding a vessel. A preliminary hearing for the sailor is scheduled for mid-November, navy officials said.</p><p>Along with the <em>Bonhomme Richard</em></p>
Before yesterdayMain stream

France upgrades La Fayette-class frigates

20 October 2021 at 08:05
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]25429764-b82d-4987-9d61-dc19f34b9545?sfvrsn=416fdea6_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_7744-jdw-14722.jpg?sfvrsn=416fdea6_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small"> The DGA received the first upgraded FLF, Courbet, on 13 September. (Ministère des Armées)</p> <p>Upgrade work on the first-of-class Frégate de type La Fayette (FLF) La Fayette-class frigate began on 4 October, the Direction Générale de l'Armement (DGA), the French defence procurement agency, announced on its website on 15 October.</p> <p> Three of the French Navy's five FLFs are being upgraded: <em>Courbet, La Fayette,</em> and <em>Aconit.</em> The DGA received the first upgraded FLF frigate, <em>Courbet,</em> on 13 September after the ship completed sea trials. The trials took place in the Mediterranean beginning in mid-June after <em>Courbet</em> underwent a nine-month refit. The agency expects the third upgraded FLF, <em>Aconit,</em> to be delivered in 2023. </p> <p>The EUR400 million (USD465 million) upgrade includes the installation of a KingKlip Mk 2 hull-mounted sonar to provide the three FLFs anti-submarine warfare capabilities. Workalso involves upgrading the frigates' combat systems and optronic surveillance capabilities, as well as reinforcing their structure and stability. The Crotale CN2 point defence missile system is being replaced by two reconditioned Sadral sextruple launchers armed with Mistral infrared-guided very-short-range surface-to-air missiles.</p> <p>The DGA is responsible for site project management and Naval Group for industrial project management. Meanwhile, Chantiers de l'Atlantique is overhauling the frigates under the prime contractorship of the Service de Soutien de la Flotte (Fleet Support Service). The work is being conducted at France's naval base in Toulon.</p> <p> The DGA reported that the trials with <em>Courbet</em> demonstrated the manoeuvrability of the frigate despite an increase in its displacement of over 80 tonnes, confirmed its continued low acoustic signature, and validated the improved performance of the new combat management system. </p>

US Naval Surface Forces commander looks to expand condition-based maintenance

19 October 2021 at 06:50
<p>Having required the inclusion of condition-based maintenance plus (CBM+) in the development of the US Navy (USN) Constellation-class guided-missile frigate (FFG 62), the service is looking to expand CBM+ principles to other surface ships, according to Vice Admiral Roy Kitchener, commander of Naval Surface Forces and Pacific Fleet Naval Surface Force.</p> <p>β€œWe can take some of that technology for FFG 62 and put it on an LPD (amphibious transport dock) 17 or a gas-turbine engine to help us mitigate some of that risk,” Vice Adm Kitchener said on 18 October during a keynote address at the American Society of Naval Engineers Fleet Maintenance and Modernization Symposium 2021.</p> <p>β€œThere's no reason we should not be able to do that,” Vice Adm Kitchener added.</p> <p>CMB+ combines emerging advancements in technology such as Artificial Intelligence (AI) and prognostics software, helping sailors β€œto find and fix things,” Vice Adm Kitchener said, in real time.</p> <p>β€œThis information we put into CBM systems must be transmitted off the ship to all of us to analyse,” he said. β€œBut more importantly, our sailors need to be trained on it, they need it available to them, so they troubleshoot systems.”</p> <p>Vice Adm Kitchener also noted, β€œAI and machine learning are tools that transform the effectiveness of all our processes.”</p> <p>Referring to AI, he said, β€œWe need to embrace it, not be afraid of it.”</p> <p>The USN, he pointed out, had recently established an analytics group to focus on machine learning across the surface force β€œto improve our readiness and effectiveness in a measurable way”.</p> <p>The group will manage the β€œmassive amounts” and β€œtroves” of data created by the surface force, he said.</p>

Japan spots Chinese and Russian warships sailing through the Tsugaru Strait for the first time

19 October 2021 at 05:35
<p>Chinese and Russian warships have been spotted for the first time sailing through international waters at the Tsugaru Strait located between Japan's main islands of Honshu and Hokkaido, the Japanese Ministry of Defense (MoD) announced on 18 October.</p> <p>The MoD said it is the first time that the ministry spotted Chinese and Russian warships going through the strait simultaneously. It noted that a total of 10 ships were identified.</p> <p> The MoD said Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force minesweepers JS <em>Izushima </em> and JS <em>Aoshima </em> as well as P-3C maritime patrol aircraft confirmed that five of the vessels belonged to the Chinese Navy – including one Type 055 (Renhai-class) destroyer – while the other five belonged to the Russian Navy, including two Udaloy-class destroyers. </p> <p>The vessels were spotted about 110 km southwest of Hokkaido's Okushiri Island in the Sea of Japan (also known as the East Sea) at around 08.00 hrs local time, said the MoD, adding that they entered the Pacific Ocean through the Tsugaru Strait in the afternoon.</p> <p>This comes after China and Russia had conducted a joint annual naval exercise called β€˜Joint Sea 2021' in the Sea of Japan from 14 to17 October that featured 15 naval vessels, including destroyers and submarines. A further 12 fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters were also deployed during the manoeuvres, which included anti-submarine warfare drills.</p> <p>Some of the vessels spotted sailing through the Tsugaru Strait are believed to have taken part in the annual bilateral exercise series, the first iteration of which took place in 2012.</p>

Canada upgrades maritime COMINT/SIGINT capability under Project Strongbow

15 October 2021 at 08:22
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]0efa0b1b-c3e6-4d49-9d7d-c08c2e6783ac?sfvrsn=d1c46fe_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_7558-jni-14634.jpg?sfvrsn=d1c46fe_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small">Under Project Strongbow, the Halifax-class frigates will receive a tactical radio direction finding and signals collection, analysis, fusion, and exploitation strategic capability. (Canadian DoD)</p> <p>Canada is investing in an improved communications intelligence (COMINT) and signals intelligence (SIGINT) capability, known as Project Strongbow, for the Royal Canadian Navy's (RCN's) 12 Halifax-class frigates.</p> <p>Under a CAD40.9 million (USD32.5 million) contract, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) is to supply a new COMINT/SIGINT solution that will replace the obsolete AN/SRD-504 VHF/UHF equipment suite. The new capability is expected to be delivered from 2023, and is projected to remain in service for at least the next 15 years.</p> <p>Project Strongbow will provide tactical radio direction finding and signals collection, analysis, fusion and exploitation strategic capability to the Halifax-class frigates. The requirement promulgated by Public Works and Government Services Canada called for a system combining new main mast antennas (with space and weight not to exceed that apportioned to AN/SRD-504) together with below decks processing and a below-decks human machine interface. It also specified a modular design architecture based on commercial, off-the-shelf (COTS) components in order to facilitate upgrades and technology insertions through-life.</p> <p>In its latest annual report, SwRI revealed that the system it will deliver to the RCN will use a new cylindrical, long-slot antenna array. Developed under internal funding, the new design has β€œdemonstrated high-quality, omnidirectional output while also performing well as a [direction finding] array”.</p>

Nigeria orders second OCEA survey vessel

15 October 2021 at 04:20
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]0ba03e5f-5d4e-4a31-83db-e4dc458ed4b7?sfvrsn=b2ee74d9_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_7544-jdw-14625.jpg?sfvrsn=b2ee74d9_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small">A schematic of the OCEA OSV 115 survey ship ordered by Nigeria. (OCEA)</p> <p>French shipyard OCEA has confirmed that the Nigerian Navy has awarded it a contract to build a second hydrographic survey vessel.</p> <p> It announced on 12 October that the new OSV 115 SC-WB survey vessel will be 35 m long, making it smaller than NNS <em>Lana</em> , the 60 m OSV 190 SC-WB it delivered to the Nigerian Navy earlier this year. </p> <p>The OSV 115 is a new design that the company said would be equipped with multi- and single-beam echosounders, water sampling capability, a web laboratory, and a 5.6 m boat equipped to carry out surveys in shallow water. It will have a crew of 12, have a top speed of 12 kt, and a range of 3,000 n miles at 10 kt.</p> <p>Nigerian Navy Commander Vice Admiral Az Gambo said on 15 August that a 35 m survey ship had been ordered but did not say which company would construct it.</p> <p>The navy has said that the re-establishment of its hydrographic capability will enable it to contribute to the General Bathymetric Charts of the Oceans' (GEBCO's) Seabed 2030 project and the Global Multi-Resolution Topography (GMRT) synthesis project, helping to fulfil Nigeria's obligations under the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea.</p>

Chinese, Russian navies conduct co-ordinated anti-submarine drill in Sea of Japan

15 October 2021 at 03:05
<p>The People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) and the Russian Navy are carrying out a co-ordinated anti-submarine drill in the Sea of Japan (East Sea) in a sign of growing interoperability between the two services.</p> <p>The drill is being carried out as part of β€˜Joint Sea' 2021, the series of bilateral naval exercises that have been taking place between the two services since 2012. The exercise is being held from 14–17 October, Russian state news agency TASS reported.</p> <p> The PLAN is participating in the exercise with the Type 052D destroyer <em>Kunming</em> , the first-of-class Type 055 destroyer <em>Nanchang</em> , two of its Type 056 corvettes, <em>Qinzhou</em> and <em>Luzhou</em> , an undisclosed diesel submarine, and supporting vessels. </p> <p> The exercise marks <em>Nanchang</em> 's first known deployment to an exercise with a foreign navy. </p> <p> Meanwhile, the Russian Navy is represented by its Udaloy‐class destroyer <em>Admiral Panteleyev</em> , the Steregushchiy I-class corvettes <em>Aldar Tsydenzhapov</em> and <em>Gromky</em> , a Type 877 β€˜Kilo'-type diesel-electric submarine, two coastal minesweepers, and a rescue tug. </p> <p>A further 12 fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters across the two services are also being deployed at the drills.</p> <p>Besides the anti-submarine drill, the two navies will also undertaking joint tactical manoeuvrings, mine countermeasure drills, and gunnery exercises, TASS reported on 14 October, citing information from the Russian Pacific Fleet's press office.</p>

AUSA 2021: Australian multi-mission reconnaissance watercraft unveiled at AUSA

15 October 2021 at 02:20
<p> Australian maritime design and manufacturing company The Whiskey Project unveiled a new 9.5 m multi-mission reconnaissance craft (MMRC) to US government and military attendees at the Association of the United States Army (AUSA) annual convention in Washington DC, which started 11 October. The Whiskey Project has also scheduled a series of capability demonstrations and trials with the US Marine Corps (USMC) and US Navy (USN) along the US eastern seaboard, company co-founder Ryan Carmichael told <em>Janes</em> on 4 October. </p> <p>The new craft, airfreighted from Sydney, features a Sea Blade Ultra Deep V aluminium planing hull designed by Hawaiian company Navatek in response to a commission from the US Office of Naval Research (ONR). This cuts debilitating slamming by up to 40% from that experienced by a comparable rigid hull inflatable boat (RHIB), according to the company. Designed in collaboration with USMC veterans to provide manoeuvre from the sea, the MMRC displaces 6,490 kg with a payload of more than 2,000 kg. Typically, this could include eight fully-equipped troops and two crew, all in shock-mitigating seats as part of the modular deck system; advanced systems and sensors including Teledyne FLIR integrated by Virginia company Aries Defense; fully-integrated ballistic protection; and weapon systems mounted fore, aft and amidships. The launch configuration featured at AUSA comprised three Dillon Aero 7.62mm miniguns.</p> <p>The MMRC is powered by two OXE 300 hp turbo-diesel outboards backed by a fuel capacity of 700 l and can reach speeds of up to 40 kt, depending on sea conditions.</p>

HMS Vanguard expected to return to sea next year

14 October 2021 at 07:50
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]c174ef7a-781d-4a93-b9f0-633c19a8926f?sfvrsn=da69a586_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_7487-jni-14613.jpg?sfvrsn=da69a586_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small"> Under current planning HMS Vanguard is expected to rejoin the fleet next year following the completion of its delayed LOP(R). (Crown Copyright)</p> <p>UK Royal Navy (RN) chiefs hope the nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine (SSBN) HMS <em>Vanguard</em> will have competed a delayed refuelling next year and sail to the east coast of the US to test fire its Trident weapon system.</p> <p>A senior RN source told <em>Janes </em>on 8 October that the submarine would complete the refit – which has taken twice as long as expected and is believed to be considerably over budget – in time for the weapon demonstration β€œin mid-2022”.</p> <p><em>Vanguard</em> started its three-year Long Overhaul Period (Refuel) – (LOP[R]) – at Babcock International's Devonport facility in Plymouth in December 2015, but the project has experienced technical problems and the imposition of safety restrictions during the Covid 19 pandemic.</p> <p>Microscopic cracks were detected in similar fuel rods to those used on <em>Vanguard </em>during trials at a test reactor in Dounreay, on the north coast of Caithness, a decade ago. This prompted the Ministry of Defence to order the submarine to be refuelled even though its reactor was not designed to be refuelled for a second time. The technical challenges of this unforeseen work meant the LOP(R) was already behind schedule when the pandemic struck in March 2020.</p> <p>The senior RN source told <em>Janes </em>that the project had been reset by Babcock and a new delivery schedule had been agreed with the shipyard, which has the exclusive contract to overhaul the UK nuclear-powered submarines at its Devonport facility.</p>

Papua New Guinea commissions second Guardian-class patrol vessel

14 October 2021 at 02:35
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]de3f8d7a-72c0-49e8-99f1-27797b74911e?sfvrsn=8bffc48c_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_7425-jni-14605.jpg?sfvrsn=8bffc48c_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small"> HMPNGS Ted Diro , Papua New Guinea's first of four Guardian-class patrol vessels. The Papua New Guinea Defence Force's Maritime Element commissioned the second vessel, HMPNGS Rochus Lokinap , on 7 October 2021. (Austal)</p> <p>Papua New Guinea Defence Force's (PNGDF's) Maritime Element has commissioned its second Guardian-class patrol vessel, the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) announced on 13 October.</p> <p>The vessel, HMPNGS <em>Rochus Lokinap</em>, was commissioned at the Lobrum Naval in Papua New Guinea's Manus province on 7 October, the RAN said.</p> <p><em>Rochus Lokinap</em> was handed over to the PNGDF in March 2021. The country's first Guardian-class patrol vessel, HMPNGS <em>Ted Diro</em>, was commissioned in February 2019. Both vessels are part of the Australian government's Pacific Patrol Boat Replacement (SEA 3036) programme. The project is delivering 21 new patrol vessels as donations to 12 Pacific Island countries and Timor-Leste. The PNGDF will receive a total of four vessels under the initiative.</p> <p>The Guardian class has an overall length of 39.5 m, a beam of 8 m, and it can accommodate a crew of 23. The vessels is powered by two Caterpillar 3516C engines and it can attain a top speed of 20 kt.</p> <p>The class is designed to be equipped with a 30 mm naval gun as a primary weapon, as well as port and starboard mounts for 12.7 mm general-purpose machine guns.</p> <p>The Australian Department of Defence said in June 2021 that it has agreed to a request from Papua New Guinea to arm all four vessels it gifted with undisclosed weapons.</p>

Hellenic Navy set to receive new special operations vessel

12 October 2021 at 09:35
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]30a63d0c-f23a-43c8-899a-c3e776ac2e1d?sfvrsn=19c7ed9_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_7349-jni-14574.jpg?sfvrsn=19c7ed9_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small">Agenor was built with funding provided by the Hellenic Navy. (Dimitrios Mitsopoulos)</p> <p>Hellenic Shipyards is preparing to hand over the first domestically designed and built special operations craft (SOC) to the Hellenic Navy in the coming weeks, the shipbuilder has told <em>Janes.</em></p> <p>The new vessel, named <em>Agenor</em>, was built with funding provided by the Hellenic Navy. It was launched on 30 July and is currently completing sea trials.</p> <p>The SOC is based on a design provided by Navinco featuring a deep V-shaped hull manufactured from aluminium alloy, which was donated by ElvalHalcor. Displacing 22 tonnes, the craft has an overall length of 17.60 m, a beam of 4.20 m and a draught of 0.95 m. It is powered by two 1,200 hp MAN V8 engines providing a cruise speed of 35 kt and a top speed of more than 45 kt at full load. It can carry a maximum payload of 4.5 tonnes.</p> <p>The propulsion system, supplied by New Zealand manufacturer Q-SPD, includes QSD236 drive systems with surface piercing propellers, drive shafts, a full steering system and a fully integrated exhaust system. The vessel is designed to operate out to a maximum range of up to 350 n miles in Sea State 4, depending on payload.</p> <p>The sensor fit includes a Miltech Hellas MLT-SUR-100RTM 2-axis gyrostabilised electro-optical sensor, a SIMRAD navigation/surveillance radar, two marine cameras, CCTV and an automatic identification system (AIS).</p> <p><em>Agenor</em> can be optionally fitted with the Scytalys MΒ²IMS tactical mission system, which integrates datalinks and software-defined radios to create a common operational picture beyond the platform's own sensors.</p>

AUSA 2021: Pentagon eyes new β€˜rapid fielding' experimentation series for 2023

12 October 2021 at 08:50
<p>The US Department of Defense (DoD) is plotting to begin a series of technology experiments in fiscal year 2023 (FY 2023) to consider a variety of rapid fielding projects, and is seeking FY 2022 funding to get the effort started, according to the Pentagon's chief technology officer.</p> <p>Heidi Shyu, undersecretary of defence for research and engineering (OUSD(R&amp;E)), said on 12 October that her office has mapped capability gaps and plans a set of experiments intended to inform which prototypes might move ahead.</p> <p>OUSD(R&amp;E) worked with the Joint Staff to define the capability gaps, then worked with the US combatant commands on the scenarios driving those gaps, then asked the military services what products they had that could fill those gaps, Shyu told reporters during the annual Association of the United States Army conference in Washington, DC.</p> <p>In five weeks her office received 203 White Papers ranging from β€˜unclassified' to β€˜top secret - special access'. From these, Shyu said she recommended the top 32 projects that could have the greatest payoff, and briefed them to the Joint Staff, combatant commands, and military services.</p> <p>The Pentagon is now looking for funding to get the effort moving before the actual experimentation towards the end of FY 2023. β€œIt's the operators that are going to evaluate if there's utility in this particular product; if there's utility let's head towards rapid fielding,” she said.</p> <p>If it requires some added capability, then the product could enter the following cycle with updates. At first the Pentagon would do this experimentation every year, and aim for maybe two per year if the funding is available, Shyu said.</p> <p>Participants will include both internally funded industry products and contracted products bought by the services, she told <em>Janes</em>.</p>

Spain orders four new patrol boats for its paramilitary police

8 October 2021 at 09:50
<p>Spain's paramilitary police force, the Guardia Civil, has ordered four new ocean-going patrol boats for its marine division, the Servicio MarΓ­timo (SEMAR), for a total of EUR10.8 million (USD12.5 million).</p> <p>The two contracts have gone to yards in the Ria de Vigo estuary in the northwestern region of Galicia – Rodman Polyships and Aister Aluminium Shipyard.</p> <p>The two larger vessels, measuring up to 22 m will be built by Rodman for EUR6.2 million of the total. They will have aluminium hulls and polyester reinforced glass fibre superstructure and will each be powered by two 1,400 CV motors.</p> <p>The boats are slated to be used to combat illegal immigration and drug smuggling, protect the environment, and conduct general patrol operations.</p> <p>The boats will be able to operate for up to five days with a crew of five.</p> <p>The two high-speed vessels of up to 18.5 m long will be built by Aister to boost SEMAR's fast response in controlling drug smuggling and organised crime. The boats will be used for missions of up to 12 hours, carry a standard crew of four, and be capable of reaching 55 kt in seas with waves reaching a height of up to 0.5 m.</p> <p>Built of an aluminium alloy, the boats will be fitted with two diesel engines of at least 1,800 CV each.</p>

Greek corvettes to follow frigates

8 October 2021 at 09:20
<p>A corvette programme for the Hellenic Navy is to follow the frigate programme already agreed, Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis announced to the Greek Parliament on 7 October.</p> <p>With the parliament approving the Greek–French Strategic Defence Co-operation Agreement, Mitsotakis said officially for the first time that a corvette programme will be announced very soon.</p> <p>Later in the same session Defence Minister Nikolaos Panagiotopoulos gave some additional details on the mid-term procurement plan of the Hellenic Armed Forces. He said that, according to the new force structure plan for the years 2020–25, the requirements are for 48 new-generation fighters and 12 or 13 major surface vessels, namely frigates and corvettes.</p> <p>The budget for the Hellenic Navy, said the minister, is EUR5 billion (USD5.8 billion), of which EUR2.9 billion has been allocated to the frigate programme, allowing a significant amount for new corvettes. Panagiotopoulos added he is sure that β€œsome of these ships, if not all of them, will be built in a Greek shipyard”.</p>

DALO signs framework agreement with OceanScan-MST to deliver LAUVs

8 October 2021 at 06:50
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]f33a68a2-9406-480b-8e2b-a2bd83a46cc8?sfvrsn=c53c2061_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_7212-jni-14482.jpg?sfvrsn=c53c2061_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small">The Light Autonomous Underwater Vehicle developed by Portugal's OceanScan-Marine Systems &amp; Technology. (OceanScan Marine Systems &amp; Technology)</p> <p>The Danish Defence Acquisition and Logistics Organisation (DALO) has signed a framework agreement with Portugal's OceanScan-Marine Systems &amp; Technology for an initial purchase of up to six Light Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (LAUVs) to support the Danish Mine Counter Measure (MCM) Division.</p> <p>A contract award notice was released by DALO on 28 September. Delivery is expected to start in the first quarter of 2022.</p> <p>LAUV is a modular and man-portable underwater vehicle that can be adapted for a range of commercial and military applications that includes mine‐countermeasures, rapid environment assessment, anti‐submarine warfare, search‐and‐rescue operations, port surveillance and security, and oceanographic and hydrographic survey operations.</p> <p>The LAUV has a diameter of 150 mm, is 1.15 to 2.3 m long and weighs 15 to 35 kg depending on the configuration. The LAUV can operate in stand‐alone or networked operations to a depth of 100 m.</p> <p>Each vehicle features three sections: the nose (wet) section includes sensors; the main (dry) section houses batteries; and the tail (dry) section has a servo motor. It is powered by lithium-ion batteries and can operate for up to 8 hours.</p>

Autonomous APAC24 set for OPV trials

7 October 2021 at 22:50
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]d28e5b52-6fef-4fdd-b270-12f1ecdaabf4?sfvrsn=af61147b_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_7155-idr-14471.jpg?sfvrsn=af61147b_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small">NavyX's Pacific 24 USV pictured at launch in early June 2020. (BAE Systems)</p> <p>The UK Royal Navy (RN) is planning to trial an Autonomous Pacific 24 (APAC24) rigid inflatable boat from a Batch 1 River-class offshore patrol vessel (OPV).</p> <p>Developed by BAE Systems and operated by the RN's NavyX autonomy and lethality accelerator, the APAC24 is an unmanned surface vehicle (USV) testbed being used to support investigations of how a USV based on a standard sea boat could deliver force protection and intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions. The APAC24 is an adaptation of the standard 7.5 m Pacific 24 Mk 4 sea boat deployed across the RN surface fleet.</p> <p>According to the RN, it is planned to run trials of the APAC24 from a Batch 1 River-class OPV at an unspecified date in 2022. In support of the trial, the Navy Command Headquarters on 6 October issued an invitation to tender (ITT) for the purchase of a launch and recovery system to be fitted to the host vessel.</p> <p>According to the ITT, the APAC24 requires manual recovery to the ship using existing davit equipment and therefore requires that personnel transfer between boats. This represents a potentially hazardous activity in a seaway.</p> <p>Instead, the RN is seeking a system to enable launch and recovery of an unmanned APAC24 to a Batch 1 River-class OPV (either moving or stationary). It has stipulated that there should be no personnel in the boat (although it can operate under remote control rather than fully autonomously) .</p>

Taiwan starts building second improved Tuo Chiang-class corvette for RoCN

7 October 2021 at 07:50
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]dbbb4cfa-6384-4bb5-9895-d700ab2b8a0b?sfvrsn=6f3f0744_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_7013-jdw-14466.jpg?sfvrsn=6f3f0744_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small">Taiwanese officials and navy personnel held a ceremony on 6 October at Lungteh Shipbuilding's facilities in Suao to mark the start of construction of the second improved Tuo Chiang-class fast missile corvette for the RoCN. (Taiwan's Military News Agency)</p> <p>Taiwan's Lungteh Shipbuilding has begun construction work on the second improved Tuo Chiang (also spelt Tuo Jiang)-class fast missile corvette on order for the Republic of China Navy (RoCN).</p> <p>A steel-cutting ceremony for the vessel was held on 6 October at the company's facilities in Suao, Yilan County, Taiwan's Military News Agency (MNA) reported that same day, while confirming that this is the second of six corvettes of the improved variant set to be built by 2023. According to Taiwanese media reports, up to five more of these corvettes are expected to follow.</p> <p><em>Ta Chiang</em> (pennant number 619), the first series-produced vessel of the improved variant, entered service with the RoCN in a ceremony held on 9 September at the Suao Naval Base that was also attended by Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen. </p> <p>Developed under the Hsun Hai programme, the Tuo Chiang-class corvettes feature a wave-piercing catamaran hull form, waterjet propulsion, and a low radar cross-section (RCS) design. </p> <p>The new ships are intended to be deployed on the low-intensity maritime security missions that are currently undertaken by the RoCN's larger and more expensive destroyers and frigates, while providing an affordable, asymmetrical solution against an adversary's amphibious landing and other large ships in the case of a conflict.</p> <p> The vessels of the improved variant feature several enhancements over first-of-class <em>Tuo Chiang</em> – which was commissioned in late 2014 – in weaponry, mission systems, and design. </p>

DSME launches ASR-II submarine rescue ship for South Korean navy

7 October 2021 at 06:05
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]df0ed910-2420-4b7f-83c7-068d4c083741?sfvrsn=fd2e922e_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_6996-jdw-14463.jpg?sfvrsn=fd2e922e_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small"> DSME held a launch ceremony for Ganghwado , a new auxiliary submarine rescue ship for the Republic of Korea Navy, on 7 October at its Okpo shipyard on Geoje Island. (RoKN)</p> <p>South Korean shipbuilder Daewoo Shipbuilding &amp; Marine Engineering (DSME) held a launch ceremony on 7 October for a new auxiliary submarine rescue ship (ASR-II) for the Republic of Korea Navy (RoKN).</p> <p> Named <em>Ganghwado</em> , the 5,600-tonne vessel entered the water at DSME's Okpo shipyard on Geoje Island and is expected to be delivered to the navy around mid-2023 following a series of trials and evaluations. </p> <p>The 120 m-long ASR-II (with pennant number 22) is being built under a KRW444 billion (USD373 million) contract awarded to DSME in December 2018 by South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA).</p> <p> Once in service, the ship, which has an overall beam of 19 m, will supplement the 103 m-long, 3,200-tonne RoKS <em>Cheonghaejin </em> auxiliary submarine rescue ship, which was commissioned into the RoKN in November 1996 and is able to operate in waves of 2 m or smaller. </p> <p>The ASR-II – which is expected to embark a mid-size helicopter, reach speeds of up to 20 kt, and have a crew complement of 130 – features a β€˜centre well' (moon pool) through which a deep-sea rescue vessel (DSRV) capable of carrying 17 people at a time will be deployed to rescue the crews of distressed submarines at depths of up to 500 m amid waves as high as 4 m.</p> <p><em>Janes</em></p>

HHI lays keel for RoKN's first KDX-III Batch II guided-missile destroyer

6 October 2021 at 08:35
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]ef0be1d0-e09c-4fdd-8de5-72d22467dfcb?sfvrsn=7d97aec6_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_6930-jdw-14447.jpg?sfvrsn=7d97aec6_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small">An artist impression of the first ship of the second batch of KDX-III-class guided-missile destroyers for the RoKN. South Korean shipbuilder HHI announced on 6 October that it had held a keel-laying ceremony for this destroyer the previous day. (HHI)</p> <p>South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) has announced that it held a keel-laying ceremony on 5 October in Ulsan for the first of three Sejong Daewang (KDX-III)-class Batch II guided-missile destroyers for the Republic of Korea Navy (RoKN).</p> <p>Construction of the destroyer began in February after HHI secured a KRW676.6 billion (USD565 million) contract in October 2019 for the β€˜detailed design' and build of the warship, which is expected to be launched in the second half of 2022 and handed over to the navy in November 2024.</p> <p>The Batch II vessels will be larger and feature more advanced systems and armament that those of the first batch. According to HHI, the new destroyers will be 170 m long (about 3 m longer than the three KDX-III ships of the first batch), 21 m wide, and have a standard displacement of 8,100 tonnes (compared to the 7,600 tonnes of the Batch I ships), which will make them the largest destroyers in RoKN inventory once they enter service.</p> <p>HHI said that this improved variant is expected to be capable of operating at speeds of up to 30 kt, feature an improved ballistic missile defence capability, and be equipped with enhanced anti-submarine warfare technology, including a more powerful sonar to detect and track submarines at longer ranges.</p>

Indian Coast Guard takes delivery of another Sankalp-class OPV

6 October 2021 at 02:05
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]6ad6e2e0-9ffe-49e9-87f5-ed110579ffad?sfvrsn=1828aba4_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_6880-jni-14434.jpg?sfvrsn=1828aba4_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small"> A Sankalp-class OPV, ICGS Samarth . Its sister ship, ICGS Sarthak, was handed over to the Indian Coast Guard on 30 September. (Indian Coast Guard)</p> <p>The Indian Coast Guard (ICG) has taken delivery of another Sankalp-class offshore patrol vessel (OPV).</p> <p>The vessel, ICGS <em>Sarthak</em> with pennant no 21, was handed over by its builder Goa Shipyard on 30 September.</p> <p>It is the fourth vessel in Batch III of the Sankalp class, the contract for which was awarded in August 2016. The vessel was laid down on 10 November 2018 and launched on 13 August 2020.</p> <p>The vessel has a displacement of 2,457 tonnes with a length of 105 m, beam of 13.6 m, and draught of 3.65 m.</p> <p>The vessel is powered by two 24,406 hp (18.2 MW) MTU 20V 8000 M71L diesel engines , is equipped with two shafts, and has a maximum speed of 24 kt. It is manned by a crew of 112 personnel, and has a range of 6,500 n miles at 13.8 kt.</p> <p>The navigation and surveillance suite comprises one Sperry Marine E/F/I-band and a Sperry Marine S-band radars. Based on the weapons fit of its sister ships, the vessel is expected to be fitted with one Bofors 40 mm/60 main gun and two 12.7 mm stabilised remote-controlled machine guns for point defence.</p> <p>The OPV has a helicopter deck that can accommodate a 6.8-tonne helicopter such as the Dhruv Mk III Advanced Light Helicopter for maritime patrol and search-and-rescue (SAR) roles. The ship can also carry two rigid hull inflatable boats.</p> <p>The vessel will be deployed primarily for maritime patrol, SAR operations, pollution control response, and at-sea firefighting duties.</p>

Indonesia to implement Arrowhead 140 design on Iver Huitfeldt-variant contract

5 October 2021 at 03:20
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]7ea4787e-d07a-49db-b88f-b1c0232be3f6?sfvrsn=1fde3153_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_6824-jni-14421.jpg?sfvrsn=1fde3153_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small">PT PAL is implementing the Arrowhead 140 design on a two-ship contract it signed with the Indonesian MoD in April 2020. (Babcock)</p> <p>Indonesian shipbuilder PT PAL will implement the Arrowhead 140 design on a contract it secured from Jakarta in April 2020 for two Iver Huitfeldt class-variant frigates.</p> <p>In response to questions from <em>Janes</em>, PT PAL's public affairs office confirmed that the two-ship contract worth USD720 million is officially in force, and work is under way in Surabaya, Indonesia, to prepare for the first build.</p> <p>However, <em>Janes</em> also understands from a separate industry source that discussions are still ongoing between PT PAL and Babcock on design modifications that will be undertaken to meet the Indonesian Navy's requirements.</p> <p>As reported by <em>Janes</em> in June 2020, the Indonesian Ministry of Defence (MoD) signed a preamble contract for a variant of the Iver Huitfeldt frigate with PT PAL in April 2020. However, the two-ship contract only became effective from 24 May 2021, PT PAL told <em>Janes</em> on 5 October.</p> <p>The Arrowhead 140 is based on the Royal Danish Navy's Iver Huitfeldt-class frigate that was designed by Odense Maritime Technology . The Arrowhead 140 design also forms the basis for the UK Royal Navy's new Type 31 Inspiration-class frigates, the contract for which was signed in September 2019.</p> <p>Incidentally, the Arrowhead140 is also one of four designs shortlisted by Indonesia for another six-ship frigate programme. Jakarta has since selected the Bergamini (FREMM)-class design for this project.</p> <p>Subsequently in September 2021, UK defence group Babcock signed a design licence agreement with PT PAL at the DSEI exhibition in London. The agreement provides for the build of two Arrowhead 140 frigates at PT PAL's facilities in Surabaya.</p>

Philippines begins another attempt to acquire two more LPDs

4 October 2021 at 01:35
<p>Manila has begun another attempt to procure two more landing platform docks (LPDs) for the Philippine Navy.</p> <p>The Philippine Department of National Defense (DND) published its latest invitation to bid (ITB) for the project on 30 September. The ITB outlines an approved contract budget of PHP5.56 billion (USD110 million).</p> <p>Besides two LPDs with a minimum gross tonnage of 5,000 tonnes each, the selected shipbuilder in this open competitive process will also supply four landing craft utility (LCU) vessels, four rigid hull inflatable boats (RHIBs), and other β€œmission-essential equipment”.</p> <p>These equipment include a platform management system, 12.7 mm machine guns, a downlink receiver system, an electronic chart display, and a helicopter traversing system, according to a schedule of technical specifications accompanying the ITB.</p> <p>Each vessel must be able to embark a battalion of 500 marines that can be deployed via RHIBs, amphibious assault vehicles, and multipurpose attack craft, and built with flight deck space for two helicopters, which include the AW109 and the AW159 types.</p> <p>The selected shipbuilder will also have to deliver a two-year integrated logistics support package for the vessels. The first ship must be delivered within 730 days of receiving the Notice to Proceed (NTP) from the DND, with the second vessel to be handed over within 1,095 days of this milestone.</p> <p>As per regulations set out in the country's defence procurement regulations, the vessel proposed for the LPD programme must be in service with the armed forces of the supplying country, or in service with the armed forces of at least two other countries.</p> <p>Companies seeking to participate in the ITB will have till 26 October to submit their bids.</p>

MK VI patrol boat order for Ukraine confirmed

1 October 2021 at 06:05
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]1de437f3-b101-48b3-8e90-39a6636e8907?sfvrsn=95e57f47_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_6685-jni-14378.jpg?sfvrsn=95e57f47_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small">SAFE Boats International has been awarded a contract to deliver six MK VI patrol boats to Ukraine. (SAFE Boats International)</p> <p>Plans to rebuild Ukraine's naval capability have taken a further step forward after US company SAFE Boats International received an USD84.2 million contract to deliver six MK VI patrol boats.</p> <p>The award, confirmed by the US Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) on 30 September, combines Building Partner Capacity (BPC) and Foreign Military Financing (FMF) funds. The contract includes an option for a further two MK VI craft.</p> <p>The US State Department in June 2020 approved a Foreign Military Sales case for the supply of up to 16 MK VI patrol boats and associated equipment to Ukraine. β€œThe proposed sale will improve Ukraine's capability to meet current and future threats by providing a modern, fast, short-range vessel ... to better defend its territorial waters and protect other maritime interests,” said the Defense Security Cooperation Agency in a statement issued at the time.</p> <p>SAFE Boats International was awarded a USD20 million contract by NAVSEA in December 2020 for long lead time material and associated pre-production and planning support for an initial two MK VI patrol boats for Ukraine. The new award announced at the end of September funds detail design, construction, outfitting, reactivation, and training for six MK VI craft, plus the option for two more units.</p> <p>Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 BPC funds using Ukraine Security Assistance Funding to the amount of USD43.7 million and FY 2021 FMF (Ukraine) funds to the amount of USD40.5 million have been obligated at the time of award. Work is expected to complete in March 2025; the completion date will be extended to March 2026 if the contract options are exercised.</p>

RN performs first UAS trials from carrier Prince of Wales

30 September 2021 at 03:05
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]54909fbb-266f-43e5-882a-40b0c7c480a9?sfvrsn=32ffdcf7_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_6501-jni-14365.jpg?sfvrsn=32ffdcf7_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small"> A QinetiQ Banshee Jet 80+ target vehicle pictured on its launcher on HMS Prince of Wales's flight deck. (Crown Copyright)</p> <p>The UK Royal Navy (RN) has completed initial trials designed to explore the operation of uncrewed air systems (UASs) from its new Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers.</p> <p>Undertaken from HMS <em>Prince of Wales</em>, the demonstration saw QinetiQ Banshee Jet 80+ aerial target vehicles launched from a pneumatic launcher on the ship's flight deck and then operated to allow an evaluation of how they might be used to train personnel in defending against air threats. The Banshee Jet 80+ is a compact, twin-jet aerial target designed to provide low-cost threat representation.</p> <p>The trials, which come less than a year before the retirement of the Hawk T1 aircraft currently used to emulate low-level air and missile threats, were performed on the Ministry of Defence's (MoD's) Hebrides Range facility off northwest Scotland.</p> <p>The MoD in February this year revealed its interest in low-cost maritime airborne uncrewed or autonomous UAS systems that could deliver threat simulation presentations to the maritime task group and offer potential for spiral development for other roles in support of the Future Maritime Aviation Force (FMAF). The RN's FMAF envisages the development of a hybrid crewed/uncrewed force in which a number of roles – notably intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance, lift, communications, and strike – are migrated to uncrewed platforms.</p> <p>Details of the UAS trials from <em>Prince of Wales</em> were released on 29 September. According to the RN, the demonstration examined how the target vehicle and its associated support equipment, including a Robonic Kontio MC2555LLR pneumatic launcher, could be integrated within a busy ship and flight deck.</p>

Indonesia configures 90 m OPVs for anti-submarine, anti-ship operations

29 September 2021 at 04:20
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]264e5484-1b4d-4607-92b4-a8b4d0e9c438?sfvrsn=950312bb_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_6388-jni-14353.jpg?sfvrsn=950312bb_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small">A computer-generated image of Indonesia's 90 m OPVs that are being built by PT Daya Radar Utama. (PT Daya Radar Utama)</p> <p>The Indonesian Navy is equipping its new class of two 90 m offshore patrol vessels (OPVs) with a Turkish combat management system (CMS) and weapons for anti-submarine and anti-ship operations.</p> <p>Schematic diagrams and other official documents forwarded to <em>Janes</em> by an industry source confirm that the Indonesian Navy has selected the Advent combat system from Turkish software company Havelsan.</p> <p>The system will be supplied with five operator consoles on a vessel combat network that has one electro-optical (EO) targeting system turret, a combined radar and EO-based fire-control system, a navigation radar, and a surveillance radar integrated with an identification friend-or-foe system.</p> <p>The CMS will also be linked to a 76/62 Super Rapid (SR) naval gun – presumably from Italian defence company Leonardo – with provisions for a 35 mm naval gun system, two 20 mm cannons, anti-surface missiles, a variable-depth sonar system, decoy launchers, and an electronic warfare radar.</p> <p>A computer-generated image of the vessel provided by shipbuilder PT Daya Radar Utama (PT DRU) indicates that the navy intends to equip the OPV with four anti-surface missile launchers mounted amidships. The image also depicts a 35 mm naval gun system in the aft section facing the flight deck, but it is unclear where the 20 mm guns will be located.</p> <p>However, except for the 76 mm naval gun, <em>Janes</em> has been informed that selection processes for the remaining weapons are yet to begin and provisions for these systems in the CMS architecture will be made on a fitted-for-but-not-with basis.</p> <p>As reported by <em>Janes</em></p>

Greece set to buy new frigates from France

28 September 2021 at 09:50
<div><img class="invisible" style="display: none" src="[images%7COpenAccessDataProvider]2bbdf84c-0b52-4a93-95d4-bdcd98bdbe8b?sfvrsn=9defb254_2"></div><div class="w-100 position-relative"> <img src="/ResourcePackages/Janes/assets/dist/images/placeholder-16-9.jpg" class="invisible w-100"> <div style="background-image: url(&quot;https://www.janes.com/images/default-source/news-images/bsp_6360-jni-14338.jpg?sfvrsn=9defb254_2&quot;)" class="news-hero bg-center bg-cover position-absolute left-0 top-0 h-100 w-100"></div></div> <p class="text-body text-muted small">The FDI HN frigate specific to the Hellenic Navy (pictured) will share significant commonality with the French parent design (Naval Group)</p> <p>Greece has signed an agreement with Naval Group and MBDA to begin negotiations on the acquisition of three FrΓ©gate de dΓ©fense et d'intervention (FDI) multimission frigates.</p> <p>The memorandum of understanding, signed by Greek defence minister NikΓ³laos PanayotΓ³poulos, Naval Group CEO Pierre Eric Pommellet, and MBDA CEO Eric BΓ©ranger, covers the potential sale of three FDI HN vessels for the Hellenic Navy, with an option for one additional ship. French sources say a contract should be concluded before the end of 2021.</p> <p>In a statement Naval Group said it planned to build all three FDI HN ships at its Lorient facility in Brittany, northwest France. The Lorient yard is already building the first two of the five FDI frigates on order for the French Navy.</p> <p> The French FDI first-of-class <em>Amiral Ronarc'h</em> is planned to commence sea trials in 2022, with handover to follow before the end of 2023. Entry into service with the French Navy is scheduled before the end of 2024. </p> <p><em>Janes</em> understands that, to accelerate the Greek programme, the second and third FDI ships will now be completed as FDI HN ships for delivery to the Hellenic Navy in 2025. The third ship for Greece would follow in 2026. </p> <p>The FDI HN variant specific to the Hellenic Navy will share significant commonality with the French parent design. The combat system will include Naval Group's own SETIS combat management system, the Thales Sea Fire active electronically scanned array multifunction radar, and the Thales CAPTAS-4 Compact low frequency active/passive variable depth sonar)</p>

Greece and France sign defence co-operation agreement

28 September 2021 at 09:50
<p>French President Emmanuel Macron and Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis signed a defence co-operation agreement between their two countries in Paris on 28 September. </p> <p>Concurrently, Greek Defence Minister Nicos Panagiotopoulos signed a memorandum of understanding with Naval Group CEO Pierre Eric Pommellet and MBDA CEO Eric BΓ©ranger to start negotiations on the purchase of three Belh@rra-class FrΓ©gate de DΓ©fense et d'Intervention (FDI) mid-size frigates, designated FDI HN, with an option for a fourth.</p> <p>Mitsotakis said the defence co-operation agreement paves the way for β€œautonomous” European defence, β€œequal to its economic power.” He stressed that the deal with France would not affect the Mutual Defense Cooperation Agreement currently being negotiated between Greece and the United States. Macron said the agreement strengthens security co-operation and helps safeguard the sovereignty and territorial integrity of both countries.</p> <p>Under Article 2 of the agreement, Greece and France will provide each other assistance with the use of force if necessary, β€œBoth parties provide to each other help and assistance, with all appropriate means at their disposal and, if there is need of the use of armed force and they both mutually conclude that an armed attack is taking place against the sovereignty of either according to Article 51 of the United Nations Charter.”</p>
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